At the bleeding edge of law

At the bleeding edge of law is contributed by two who’ve been there and done that, David Perla and Sanjay Kamlani. The pair is known for co-founding Pangea3, an LPO pioneer, in 2004 and successfully exiting in 2012.  

In this post, they explain why they believe the long aversion to leveraging capital in law is changing fast.

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Deep thinking on the theory and practice of law

Ken Grady’s exercise in deep thinking on the theory and practice of law should be read, nay imbibed, by every practicing and aspirant lawyer, law firm leader, law school teacher and all others who care about the role of lawyers in society. Remember Philip Wood’s riveting The Fall of the Priests and the Rise of the Lawyers? If Ken and his kindred spirits are not heard, we may well be reading the sequel, The Fall of the Lawyers and the Rise of the…     

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Seeing legal services as a kaleidoscope

As my colleagues and I were researching Remaking Law Firms: Why & How we realized we were seeing the legal services landscape as a kaleidoscope. This vision became one of the pillars of our 2016 book in which Chapter 5 is titled The 2025 Kaleidoscope Scenario.

Less than three years on from the publication of Remaking Law Firms, the kaleidoscope is no longer a futurist’s scenario; it’s already here.  

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Who is responsible for the future of BigLaw firms?

Who is responsible for the future of BigLaw firms? discusses one the biggest challenges facing BigLaw firms: Investing in the future.

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What real transformative change could look like

What real transformative change could look like is the sequel to Ken’s post on The Dialogue two days ago, Stagnation and the legal services industry. Ken does us all a great service by painting a concrete picture of his view of what the future might look like. He’s putting it out there for the rest of us to think about, test and challenge what real transformative change might look like. Let’s go to it!

I often write about radical transformation in the legal industry and how it has not arrived. That line of reasoning begs the question: what could radical transformation look like?

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Classic: Technology and the future of the law

Technology and the future of the law is published as a Classic on The Dialogue on Remaking Law Firms in early March to coincide with our 2018 Client Choice Awards. You may know that Neota Logic is the sponsor of the Law Firms category in the Awards.

I’ve designated Technology and the future of the law a Classic because Michael’s message and argument are so true as the passage of time is proving – and yet the evidence is that the large majority (perhaps as much as 85%, in Bill Henderson’s rendition of the innovation of diffusion curve below) of law firms are not listening.   

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